Cover of: thermohaline finestructure of the ocean | K. N. Fedorov

thermohaline finestructure of the ocean

  • 170 Pages
  • 4.17 MB
  • 2498 Downloads
  • English
by
Pergamon Press , Oxford [Eng.], New York
Thermoclines (Oceanography), Seawater -- Compos
StatementK.N. Fedorov ; translator, D.A. Brown ; technical editor, J.S. Turner.
SeriesPergamon marine series ; v. 2
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGC171 .F4213 1978
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 170 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4559343M
ISBN 100080216730
LC Control Number77030621

The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean is a five-chapter text that describes the fine-scale stratification phenomenon in the ocean and the physical processes that participate in its formation and govern its evolution.

After an introduction to the concept of thermohaline finestructure of the ocean, this book goes on presenting some. The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean is a five-chapter text that describes the fine-scale stratification phenomenon in the ocean and the physical processes that participate in its formation and govern its evolution.

After an introduction to the concept of thermohaline finestructure of the ocean, this book goes on presenting some Book Edition: 1. Buy The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean: Pergamon Marine Series on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean: Pergamon Marine Series: Fedorov, K.

N.: : BooksCited by: The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean: Pergamon Marine Series. Author. Fedorov, K. Publisher. Pergamon. Publication Date. Buy This Book. $ plus shipping.

By purchasing books through this website, you support our non-profit organization. Ancient History Encyclopedia receives a small commission for each book sold through our. The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean is a five-chapter text that describes the fine-scale stratification phenomenon in the ocean and the physical processes that participate in its formation and govern its evolution.

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After an introduction to the concept of thermohaline finestructure of the ocean, this book goes on presenting some methodological aspects in connection with the. The thermohaline finestructure of the ocean.

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Create Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n bgn. The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean: Pergamon Marine Series - Kindle edition by Fedorov, K. N., Swallow, J. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean: Pergamon Marine : K.

Fedorov. Thermohaline finestructure of the ocean. Oxford [Eng.] ; New York: Pergamon Press, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: K N Fedorov.

Two processes driving ocean circulation • Stresses from the thermohaline finestructure of the ocean book at the ocean’s surface • Convection induced by the loss of buoyancy • Due to cooling and/or salt input • Localized regions in polar latitudes • Causing surface waters to sink to depth • Global responses to the sinking • Thermohaline circulation.

To start, the Thermohaline circulation is a term used to describe the ocean current phenomena on Earth. The circulation travels across the Earth’s oceans, moving water between all the hemispheres. The currents in this circulation are facilitated by varying density of salt concentration throughout the oceans and the effects of temperature.

By linking mesoscale eddy stirring to micro-scale diffusion, thermohaline finestructure plays a vital role in the ocean energy cascade and water mass conversion in the northern Philippine Sea.

There are several books that deal with wind-driven ocean circulation, but few, if any, cover thermohaline-driven circulation and its energetics. This is the first advanced textbook to cover both these important aspects of large-scale ocean circulation. Until the s, a tacit agreement among many physical oceanographers was that nothing deserving attention could be found in the upper few meters of the ocean.

The lack of adequete knowledge about the near-surface layer of the ocean was mainly due to the fact that the widely used oceanographic instruments (such as bathythermographs, CTDs, current meters, etc.) were practically 4/5(1).

In the book, she successfully summarizes her own research over recent years and compiles an overview of up-to-date knowledge on past ocean circulation.

The key topics include: Modern thermohaline circulation and main stages of its development during the Cenozoic - Methods and proxies of paleoceanographic reconstruction. Thermohaline Circulation The surface currents we have discussed so far are ultimately driven by the wind, and since they only involve surface water they only affect about 10% of the ocean’s volume.

However, there are other significant ocean currents that are independent of the wind, and involve water movements in the other 90% of the ocean. Rahmstorf: Thermohaline Ocean Circulation. In: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Sciences, Edited by S. Elias. Elsevier, Amsterdam 2 The distinction of thermohaline versus wind-driven circulation originates in a 19th-Century dispute on whether ocean currents are primarily due to the wind pushing along the water or.

The Indonesian seas contain evidence of enhanced vertical mixing. Coupled with the highly stratified tropical thermocline, this enhanced mixing implies large vertical fluxes of heat and buoyancy from the ocean-atmosphere boundary downward deep into the water column.

The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean Konstantin Nikolaevich Fedorov Snippet view - Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change. Thermohaline circulation, also called Global Ocean Conveyor or Great Ocean Conveyor Belt, the component of general oceanic circulation controlled by horizontal differences in temperature and salinity.

It continually replaces seawater at depth with water from the surface and slowly replaces surface water elsewhere with water rising from deeper depths. To recap, the dynamic nature of the ocean presents a challenge to MCS for two reasons.

First, the ageostrophic motion of ocean currents, and therefore the thermohaline finestructure, is variable on time scales comparable to the data acquisition time, i.e. on the order of minutes or hours (Géli et al.,Klaeschen et al., ).

This. Ocean current - Ocean current - Thermohaline circulation: The general circulation of the oceans consists primarily of the wind-driven currents. These, however, are superimposed on the much more sluggish circulation driven by horizontal differences in temperature and salinity—namely, the thermohaline circulation.

The thermohaline circulation reaches down to the seafloor and is often. The intrusions acted to enhance heat and salt fluxes and resulted in the mixing of water masses being more efficient.

By linking mesoscale eddy stirring to micro-scale diffusion, thermohaline finestructure plays a vital role in the ocean energy cascade and water mass conversion in the northern Philippine Sea.

The Thermohaline Circulation (THC) also referred to as the “Great Ocean Conveyor” or the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), can be defined as the density-impelled circulation of the oceans.

Thermohaline is derived from the Greek: thermo- for heat and.

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into the ocean beyond. The Atlantic thermohaline circulation converts roughly 15] m3 s~1 of upper ocean water into deep water. (Oceanogra-phers designate a Sow rate of 1] m3 s~1 to be 1 Sverdrup, or Sv.

All the world’s rivers combined deliver about 1Sv of fresh water to the ocean.) Most of the 15Sv Sow of the upper part of the Atlantic. Our results (e.g., Holbrook et al. ) show spectacular images of thermohaline finestructure in the ocean (Figure 1); features such as intrusions, internal waves, and mesoscale eddies are clearly visible.

These images show the ocean in a way it has never been seen before. The past several years have seen rapid progress in defining this new tool.

Barry Ruddick's 59 research works with 2, citations and 5, reads, including: Seismic Oceanography's Failure to Flourish: A Possible Solution. This book, like the previous one ("The Thermohaline Finestructure of the Ocean") was born out of the author's continuing fascination with the role natural boundaries of all sorts and scales play in the ocean's behaviour.

In a sens e the them e is enlarge d here to encompass those lateral discontinuities in the ocea n. There are several hypotheses that state that the prolonged effect of global warming could eventually “shut down” the thermohaline circulation and lead to cooling in certain regions in show more content This movement of the deep water forms a giant conveyor belt that covers a large part of the open ocean.

Finestructure observations gathered in the equatorial Pacific are discussed. The measurements consist of a 48 h CTD time series within the salinity front at the northern edge of.

functioning of the deep ocean thermohaline circulation. What is the Thermohaline circulation. The Circulation of the world’s oceans can be divided into the upper and the lower. The upper few metres movement is generally wind-driven whereas below this, circulation is driven by the heating and.

The current thermohaline circulation of the World’s Ocean keeps this from happening today (by moving surface ocean water downward in the North Atlantic), but many oceanographers worry about recent anthropogenic global warming, which could result in another inversion of the ocean, with deep ocean water rising to the surface.The World Ocean thermohaline circulation is frequently idealized as a conveyor belt transporting heat and freshwater from the Indo–Pacific to the Atlantic (Broecker ).This interocean exchange of heat and freshwater, closely associated with the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), is of key importance for the climatic and hydrographic differences between the North Atlantic and.

"The ocean is the flywheel of the climate," said oceanographer Lisa Beal, with the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. .